Friday, January 24, 2020

Ask Your Absolute Insurance Agent: What is the difference between comprehensive and collision coverage on my auto insurance?


"What is the difference between comprehensive and collision coverage on my auto insurance?"
When you look over your auto insurance declaration page, you will notice that there are a lot of different coverages and amounts listed. If your vehicle is covered with full coverage, you will have coverage for Comprehensive Coverage and Collision Coverage, each with a deductible listed.  What is the difference between the two, and what does the deductible mean?
Collision Coverage
Collision Coverage comes into play if you are involved in an accident with another vehicle or if you hit an object such as a mailbox. Collision coverage also covers damage caused by potholes. Collision coverage will pay to repair the damages to your vehicle, minus your deductible.
  • Example:  Maria has collision coverage on her insurance policy with a $500 deductible for her Ford Explorer. An unknown driver hit her Explorer while it was parked and drove off. Maria is told that it will cost $4200 to repair her car. Her insurance company will pay $3700 to have her vehicle repaired ($4200 in damages minus her $500 deductible)
  • Example: Joe has collision coverage on his insurance policy with a $500 deductible. He is driving his minivan and backs into a cement wall behind him. The wall has no damage, but the collision with the wall has caused $2000 damage to his vehicle. His insurance company will pay $1500 to have his vehicle repaired ($2000 minus his $500 deductible)
Comprehensive Coverage
Comprehensive Coverage is sometimes referred to as “other than collision” coverage. This coverage can help pay for damages to your vehicle not caused by a collision, such as: accidents involving an animal, hail, fire, certain falling objects such as a tree branch, theft, and vandalism.  Comprehensive coverage will pay to repair the damages to your vehicle minus your deductible.
  • Example:  Shirley has comprehensive coverage on her insurance policy with a $250 deductible on her Toyota Camry. Shirley is driving home and hits a deer. She gets an estimate of $3000 to fix her vehicle.  Her insurance company will pay $2750 to have her vehicle repaired ($3000 minus her $250 deductible)
  • Example: James has comprehensive coverage on his insurance policy with a $500 deductible on his truck. A hail storm sweeps through James’ town and his truck suffers $2000 in hail damage. His insurance company will pay $1500 to have his truck repaired ($2000 minus $500 deductible)
Your insurance company might decide that your vehicle is “totaled” when the cost to repair the car is greater than the value of the vehicle or in some cases when it reaches a certain percentage of its value.  In that instance, your insurance company will issue payment for the Actual Cash Value of the totaled vehicle minus your comprehensive or collision deductible.